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Chapter 2 - Chapter 3 - Chapter 5

Spell Duels

Spell duels are a form of specialized combat between two spell casters. There are also the rules for Spell Contests that are part of the traditional Festival Events.

When two spellcasters have a disagreement that can’t be solved amicably, a magical duel is often the best way to resolve the dispute. Duels are also fought to prove who is more proficient in the magical arts, and many apprentices enter magical duels with their peers to demonstrate their skills. The duel is a highly refined form of combat, more subtle than simply squaring off and hurling spells until an opponent fails a saving throw and infinitely more subtle than physical combat.

To conduct a magical duel, the opponents must seek out a third spellcaster who agrees to oversee the event and assist with the construction of the arena where it is to take place. It often helps bring a few friends along to the duel site to help guard against treachery or unwelcome interventions from third parties.

An Example of Magical Dueling

Creating the Arena

The arena is a magical construct that the combatants must forge cooperatively. To form the arena, the two opponents must participate in a protocol similar to casting a spell. They begin by standing at arm’s length, then circle each other, chanting and gesturing for a full turn. If the combatants’ concentration is disturbed before the arena is completed, the preparations must begin again. Typical disturbances include anything that would normally prevent spellcasting, but even loud noises can ruin the creation process.

The mediator then casts some kind of protective spell over the combatants. Wall of force is the usual choice, but any protective spell that encompasses the two combatants is sufficient. The combatants now have the option of contributing their own spells. The spells contributed need not be protective spells, but they must be currently memorized. A contributed spell disappears from the character’s memory as though it had been cast; the spell does not have its normal effect but instead helps determine how large the arena is, which combatant has the advantage, and how severe the consequences of defeat are. Unscrupulous characters might contribute multiple spells or spells stored in scrolls or other devices to increase their chances of gaining the initial advantage and to raise the stakes beyond what the opponent would willingly undertake.

Spells contributed to the arena are recorded secretly by the players involved. The characters involved in the duel cannot tell how many spells their opponent is contributing or how long the opponent spends casting them, but the mediator is aware of the spells contributed by both sides.

Balance of Power

If the two opponents are not the same level, the number of spell levels each character contributes to the arena cannot exceed the weaker opponent’s level. For example, if Calvin, a 7th level wizard, is dueling Delsenora, a 12th level priest, neither character could contribute a spell higher than 7th level or multiple spells totaling seven levels or more. There is no limit to the number of spells that can be contributed if both opponents are the same level.

When the arena is complete, the two combatants are standing still with a ball of shimmering force hovering between them. A close look at the ball reveals tiny images of the two combatants floating opposite each other. The images are mental constructs that represent the combatants in the duel.

Characters must willingly cooperate to form an arena and conduct a duel. A character under a magical or psionic compulsion, such as a charm person or suggestion spell, cannot be forced to give consent. A character can be intimidated into giving consent in any number of ways, including a geas or quest spell. Consent given under threat is still consent for purposes of a magical duel as long as the character in question is free to think for himself. In the case of a geas or quest spell, the subject is free to ignore the request for a duel and face the consequences.

Arena Physics

Although the arena looks like a sphere from the outside, it has a weird geometry all its own. It is best pictured as a rectangle 12 to 30 spaces long and one space wide, resembling a long, narrow corridor more than anything else. The opponents stand on opposite ends of the corridor facing each other.

The number of spaces between them depends on the highest level of spell each opponent contributed to the arena. If neither opponent contributed a spell, there are 10 intervening spaces. The highest level spell contributed by each opponent adds its level. For example, if one opponent contributed a 5th level spell and the other contributed a 3rd level spell, there would be 18 spaces between the duelists. There are never more than 30 spaces between the opponents, and only the single, highest level spell contributed by each side of the duel is factored for determining the distance between the spellcasters.

The space occupied by the duelists in the arena does not count as far as the length of the corridor is concerned. Thus, the largest arena would consist of 32 spaces, but each combatant would occupy one space at opposite ends of the corridor, leaving 30 spaces between them.

Conducting the Duel

When the arena is complete, the opponents fight by casting spells. The spells emanate from the characters’ images, and their effects become mental constructs that move across the arena and battle opposing spells along the way. To help keep track of spells cast during a duel a marker is placed on the grid of the arena.

A duel is fought in rounds, just like a normal encounter. The sequence of actions in each round is as follows:

1. The advantaged caster’s spells move and any resulting combats are conducted.

2. The disadvantaged caster’s spells move and any resulting combats are conducted.

3. Both casters cast new spells.

4. Steps 1–3 are repeated until the duel ends.

On the first round of the duel, there is no spell movement because there are no spells in the arena.

Determining Advantage

Throughout the duel, one opponent has the advantage—the upper hand—while the other caster is disadvantaged. When the duel begins, the advantage lies with the spellcaster who contributed the highest level spell to the arena (not the highest combined level of multiple spells). If neither opponent contributed any spells, or if neither opponent contributed a higher level spell than the other, each opponent rolls 1d10 and the character with the highest roll has the advantage. The opponent with the advantage retains it until one of his spells is destroyed in combat. At that point, the advantage shifts to the other opponent. Each time a spell destroys another spell in combat, the advantage shifts to the opponent who cast the victorious spell. The advantage does not shift if a character defeats a spell through use of his power rating (PR) or making a successful saving throw.

Spells in the Arena

Once cast, a spell acquires a physical form and moves across the space between the combatants, taking effect only when it reaches the opponent. Spells are not readily identifiable, but detect magic and the spellcraft proficiency can identify them. To help keep track of spells players should secretly cast to the DM only. Then an icon will be placed in the arena for the spell.

A spell never leaves the arena or affects creatures outside the arena. Remember that the combatants themselves are not in the arena—magical constructs represent them. It is not possible for combatants to cast spells upon themselves. For example, a priest involved in a duel can cast cure light wounds, but the spell appears in the arena—it does not heal any damage the caster has suffered. Likewise, a wizard can use a teleport spell, but the spell merely travels across the arena toward the opponent—it does not whisk the caster away to another place. Spells also do not truly affect the opponent. A charm person or imprisonment spell might fight its way to the opponent’s space, but when the spells take effect, the caster neither controls nor imprisons his opponent. Instead, the opponent’s actions are restricted until he can throw off their effects (see the Characters vs. Spells section for details).

If a spell encounters an opposing spell on its way across the arena, the two spells might struggle to annihilate each other before continuing on or they might pass each other. Each spell has three characteristics that govern its behavior in the arena: Type, Movement, and Power Rank.

The Spell Database contains dueling characteristics for spells to be included on the KloOge Character Sheets spell section.

Spell Interactions
TypeADADLM
ACCA
DCCAG
ADCCCAA
LAAAC
MGA

A = The opponent with the advantage decides if the spells fight or pass each other with no effect.

C = Combat must take place between the spells when they meet.

G = Generally, these types of spells ignore each other, but there are some defense spells that conduct combat with missiles; see the Special Dueling Characteristics for Spells section for details.

— = The spells pass each other with no effect.

Spell Movement
Spell Range1Movement Rate
Touch or 021
1–20 yards2
21–50 yards3
51–100 yards4
101+ yards5

1 - If the spell’s range varies with the caster’s level, its movement rate increases with the increased range. For example, a fireball cast by a 5th level wizard has a range of 60 yards (MV 4), but a fireball cast by a 15th level wizard has a range of 160 yards (MV 5).

Some spells, such as prismatic spray, have ranges listed as 0, but areas of effect that allow them to reach distant targets. These spells’ movement rates are a function of their areas of effect, not their basic ranges. Spells that allow instantaneous movement or that affect huge areas have movement rates of 5. See the Appendix for examples.

2 - Also includes spells with a range of less than one yard.

Type: A spell’s type determines what it can do and which opposing spells it must attempt to destroy. For dueling purposes, there are five types of spells:

Attack (A): The spell’s normal function in the AD&D game is to harm the target in some way. In a duel, an attack spell is used to damage or temporarily incapacitate the opponent. Spells such as charm person, web, and disintegrate are attack spells. An attack spell must conduct combat with any opposing defensive spell it meets and can conduct combat with opposing leech spells (the advantaged spellcaster decides, see below). It ignores missile and other attack spells.

If an attack spell reaches the opposing spellcaster’s square, it takes effect (see the Characters vs. Spells section for details).

Defense (D): The spell’s normal function is to protect or fortify the recipient in some fashion. In a duel, these spells are used to destroy attack spells before they cross the arena. Spells such as protection from evil, cure light wounds, and minor globe of invulnerability are defense spells. A defensive spell must conduct combat with any opposing attack spell it meets and can conduct combat with opposing leech spells. It generally ignores missiles, but some defensive spells are specifically designed to stop missiles (refer to the Special Dueling Characteristics for Spells) Defensive spells always ignore each other, and, upon reaching the opposing spellcaster’s square, vanish without affecting the opponent.

Leech (L): Outside of a duel, the spell normally does not cause harm or provide a defense. In a duel, leech spells are used to destroy other spells and to damage the opponent. Spells such as teleport, detect invisibility, and haste are leech spells. A leech spell must conduct combat with any opposing leech spell it meets and can conduct combat with opposing attack or defense spells. It ignores missiles.

If a leech spell reaches the opposing spellcaster’s square, it inflicts 1d6 points of damage per spell level. The opponent is allowed a saving throw vs. spell to reduce the damage by half.

Attack/Defense (AD): The spell’s normal function is to create a solid barrier or summon a creature. In a duel, an attack/defense spell creates a barrier that most spells cannot bypass without a battle and has the ability to inflict damage upon the opponent. The various wall and monster summoning spells as well as dispel magic are attack/defense spells. An attack/defense spell must conduct combat with any opposing defensive or attack spell it meets, and it can conduct combat with opposing leech or missile spells, as chosen by the advantaged spellcaster (see below).

If an attack/defense spell reaches the opposing spellcaster’s square, it usually inflicts 1d6 points of damage per spell level. The opponent is allowed a saving throw vs. spell or a spell combat roll to avoid the damage.

Missile (M): The spell creates or propels a physical or magical projectile that streaks toward the target, inflicting damage. In a duel, a missile spell is used to damage the opponent. Spells such as fireball, magic missile, and flame arrow are missile spells. A missile spell can conduct combat with opposing attack/defense spells. It ignores other missile, leech, attack, and most defense spells.

If a missile spell reaches the opposing spellcaster’s square, it takes effect (see the Characters vs. Spells section for details).

Power Rank (PR): The higher a spell’s power rank, the more likely it is to defeat another spell in combat. A spell’s power rank is its level plus nine. For example, a fireball is a 3rd level spell and has a PR of 12.

Movement (MV): A spell’s movement rate determines how quickly it moves across the arena. A spell need not move its full rate but can never exceed its movement rate in a single round. Most spells must move at least one space every round (unless locked in combat with another spell). The only exception is defensive spells; a defensive spell can remain in the caster’s space instead of moving across the arena, but only one such spell can remain with the caster at any given time. If the caster leaves the space, the spell stays behind.

A spell’s movement rate is based on its range, as shown on the spell movement table.

Requirements for Spellcasting

All spellcasting during a duel is simultaneous. Spells cannot be disrupted as they can during a normal encounter. Spellcasting is not always possible, however.

To cast a spell in a duel, a character must be free from the effects of hostile spells and not engaged in personal combat with his opponent. The character must have the intended spell memorized and must have any required material components in his possession. Additional components are not required, however, as the arena itself makes up for the lack. For example, the pyrotechnics spell normally requires a fire source. In a dueling arena, the spell still works.

Spell Movement and Combat

When a spell is cast, it appears in the space immediately ahead of the caster; if it is a defensive spell, it can appear in the caster’s space instead. No spell moves on the round when it is cast. If an opponent’s spell already occupies the space, the two spells must check for combat.

Movement: A spell already in the arena when a round begins moves one or more spaces toward the opponent. The spell must move at least one square forward unless it is locked or it is a defensive spell occupying the caster’s square; the latter type of spell has a movement of 0 and remains where it is until it is destroyed in combat or the duel ends. A spell need not move its full movement rate.

All of the advantaged caster’s spells move first, even if combat causes the advantage to shift to the other caster. When spells move, the spell closest to the opponent always moves first, then the next closest, and so on until all the character’s spells have moved.

It is possible for two or more spells to occupy the same space. All spells cast by one character can freely move through each other or stop in the same space. When two friendly spells begin a round in the same space, the spell with the fastest movement rate moves first.

Spells from different casters also can move through each other or stop in the same space if they are not required to conduct combat. Spells never move backward unless forced to do so by an opposing spell’s special ability.

Combat: When two opposing spells meet, the disadvantaged caster must announce his spell’s type (A, D, AD, L, or M). The advantaged caster then checks his spell’s type against Table 25 to determine if the spells battle or if they pass each other. The advantaged caster is not required to reveal his spell’s type, and neither caster is required to reveal what the spells actually are. Note that some spells must battle each other even if their types don’t require them to (see the notes on special abilities). It is the disadvantaged opponent’s responsibility to announce special abilities that might be relevant.

If combat occurs, it is conducted immediately, and all spell movement temporarily stops until the combat is resolved.

To conduct combat between spells, each player rolls 1d20 and compares the result to his spell’s power rank. If the roll is higher than the power rank, the spell fails. If the roll is equal to or less than the power rank, the spell succeeds.

If one spell fails and the other succeeds, the failed spell is destroyed. If other opposing spells exist in the same space, battle is conducted with them as well. If the winning spell was moving when the combat occurred it can finish its move after the battle. It is possible for one spell to fight several different battles in a single round, but combat between any one pair of spells is conducted only once each round.

If both spells fail, the two spells lock. Failure can occur when both spells roll higher than their power scores or when two spells with the same power scores tie each other. Locked spells prevent other spells from passing; refer to Locked Spells, below.

If both spells succeed, the spell with the higher roll destroys the spell with the lower roll.

For example, Rary casts a charm person spell (A, PR 10) that meets Serten’s cure light wounds spell (D, PR 10). The two spells must battle. Rary rolls a 12 and Serten rolls a 1. Rary’s charm person spell is destroyed because it failed its roll and Serten’s cure light wounds spell succeeds. If Rary had rolled a 9 instead of a 12, the charm person would have destroyed the cure light wounds spell because it succeeded with a higher roll. If Serten had rolled a 20 and Rary had rolled a 12 (or if both had rolled a 10), the two spells would have locked.

If an opposing spell occupies the space in front of a character during step 3 and the character casts his own spell into that space, the two spells immediately check for combat.

Character Power Scores
Ability Score1BonusPower Score
14 or less09
15110
16211
17312
18+413

1 - Wizards and bards use Intelligence/Reason. Priests, paladins, and rangers use Wisdom/Intuition.

Locked Spells: When two spells lock, they remain in place until another spell enters the space and destroys the opposing spell. No spell can move through a space containing locked spells, even if it normally could ignore the opposing spell. Once the opposing spell is destroyed, all the blocked spells are free to move normally.

For example, the charm person and cure light wounds spells from the previous example are locked. There is no further combat between the two spells until a third spell moves into the space. The next spell to move is a magic missile that belongs to Rary. Magic missile is a type M spell that normally ignores type D spells, so it cannot destroy the cure light wounds spell and is blocked until the lock is cleared. The next spell to move is Serten’s dispel magic. Dispel magic is an AD spell that normally fights the type A spell charm person. If the dispel magic spell destroys the charm person spell, the lock is cleared. If not, the lock continues and spells are still blocked from advancing past the lock.

It is possible to have multiple locked spells in the same space. When this occurs, each spell that enters the space must check against all locked spells in the area. Once all opposing spells are defeated, the lock is cleared.

Combat Between Multiple Spells: If a spell enters a space containing more than one opposing spell, all the spells must be checked for combat.

If there is a lock in the space, the opposing spell that caused the lock is checked first. If the incoming spell cannot battle the locking spell, the incoming spell is blocked and no combat occurs between it and any other spell in the space until the lock is removed.

If there is no lock in the space, the opposing spell with the highest movement rate is checked for combat. If there is no combat or the incoming spell wins the combat, the spell with the next highest movement rate is checked. This process continues until the incoming spell is destroyed or all opposing spells have been checked. If a lock occurs during the process, all combat stops until the lock is cleared.

If there are multiple locks in the space, the incoming spell checks the opposing locked spell with the highest movement rate for combat. If the incoming spell cannot conduct combat with that spell, no combat occurs and all the locks remain in place. If the incoming spell defeats the first locking spell, it checks for combat with the next fastest locking spell and so on until all the opposing locks are checked or until the incoming spell is locked or defeated.

When all locks are removed from a space containing multiple opposing spells, there is no further combat until another spell enters the space. The spell entering the space checks the opposing spell with the highest movement rate and continues checking until all the opposing spells have been checked or the spell is locked or defeated.

Character Movement and Combat

The characters involved in a duel have power ranks and can move across the arena and conduct combat just as spells do.

A character can move one space each round instead of casting a spell. Unlike a spell, characters can move forward or backward. If the character enters a space containing an opposing spell, the spell takes effect just as though the spell entered the character’s space.

A character has power rank of 9 plus a bonus for high Intelligence/Reason or Wisdom/Intuition. Characters use their power ranks for conducting combat between themselves and sometimes for resisting spells.

Characters vs. Spells: Opposing spells are immediately revealed when they enter a character’s square; when a spell hits, the character knows exactly what it is. Spells have varying effects according to their type:

Attack Spells: These take effect just as if they were cast upon the character during an adventure. However, it is important to remember that the character is not affected directly, only the mental construct that represents the character in the duel is affected.

If the spell normally allows a saving throw, the character is entitled to one in the duel. The saving throws by caster level optional rule is always used in duels; bonuses for high ability scores never apply during a duel. Refer to the individual spell description for the spell’s effects.

If the spell normally requires the caster to make an attack roll, such as Melf’s acid arrow and all touch delivered spells, the two characters conduct a combat to see if the incoming spell takes effect (see the Character vs. Character section).

If the spell inflicts damage, the appropriate number of hit points are deducted from the character’s total. Characters reduced to zero hit points or less lose the duel and suffer the effects indicated under the Spoils of Victory section.

If a spell has any lingering effects that hinder or incapacitate the target in any way—loss of mental control, immobilization, or any other effect that keeps the character from casting spells or acting freely—the character cannot move or cast spells into the arena, but he can cast counter spells or conduct combat with the spell. This represents the character’s struggle to regain control over his mental construct. A character with a positive hit point total can never be removed from the arena or forced to end the duel by a spell cast as part of the duel, such as a suggestion that tries to convince him to quit.

Combat between a character and a spell is conducted just like combat between spells except that the affected character uses his power score. If a lock occurs, the attacking spell is destroyed instead. Characters cannot opt to use their power scores instead of attempting saving throws when spells first enter their spaces.

When a spell first enters the same space occupied by their magical construct, the attacking spell is revealed and the character has the option of either making a saving throw or employing a counter spell. To cast a counter spell, the character selects a spell that can normally conduct combat with the spell (this can be affected by who has the advantage). The combat between spells is conducted normally, but both the attacking spell and the counter spell are destroyed if the counter spell wins or if there is a lock. If the counter spell is defeated, the attacking spell affects the character. A character can cast any number of counter spells during a round provided he has an appropriate spell memorized, but he can only cast a single counter spell against each incoming spell. Casting a counter spell does not prevent a character from casting a spell later in the round.

Defense Spells: These vanish when they enter the opponent’s space. A defense spell—not an AD spell—can also be cast in the character’s own space. A spell cast in this manner remains in the space until destroyed or the duel ends. Any attack or attack/defense spell that enters the space must defeat the spell before it can affect the character, and some defense spells can also combat missiles in this manner.

Attack/Defense Spells: Unless the spell has a special ability that states otherwise, an attack/defense spell inflicts 1d6 points of damage per spell level when it reaches an opponent’s space. The opponent is allowed a saving throw vs. spells to negate the damage.

Leech Spells: Unless the spell has a special ability that states otherwise, a leech spell inflicts 1d6 points of damage per spell level when it reaches an opponent’s space. The opponent is allowed a saving throw vs. spells to reduce the damage by half.

Missile Spells: These spells follow the same procedures as attack spells.

Characters vs. Multiple Spells: If several hostile spells enter a character’s space at once, the character deals with all of them simultaneously, making saving throws, conducting combat and casting counter spells; it is possible for a character to cast multiple counter spells in a single round.

The character must deal with any spell that began the round in his space first and then with the fastest opposing spell, and so on until he conducts combat with every spell in the space. If some of the spells in the space do not allow counter spells, such as creature summoning spells, the character can use counter spells against any spells in the space that do allow counter spells.

Character vs. Character: Combat between characters occurs whenever two characters occupy the same space as well as when a spell that requires an attack roll enters a character’s space. Character combat is conducted just like spell combat, except that locks are treated differently.

If a spell causes character combat, the attacker uses his power score or the spell’s, whichever is higher. The spell takes effect if its caster wins the combat. The spell is destroyed if it is defeated or locked. The defender can respond with his power score or a counter spell.

If two characters are engaged in combat, the winning character can choose to inflict 1d6 points of damage or send the loser 1d4 spaces away in either direction, but in no case can the loser be moved out of the arena. If the forced movement takes the character into a space containing an opposing spell, the spell takes effect.

It is not possible to cast spells while engaged in character combat. Counter spells cannot be used against another character.

Identifying Spells: Spells are not readily identifiable when they are moving across the arena. However, a spell is always revealed when it is in the same space as the opponent.

A character with the spellcraft proficiency can try to identify opposing spells instead of moving or casting a spell. The character chooses any spell currently in the arena and rolls a power check. If the roll succeeds, the spell is revealed. This can be particularly useful for targeting specific enemy spells.

Magical Items and Preexisting Spells

Because a dueling arena is a mental construct, it is not possible to carry any sort of equipment into it; the opponents enter the arena only in their minds. Certain items, however, can affect the course of a duel.

Items that actually store spells or spell energy can be employed to create spells during a duel. Such items include rings of spell storing, magical scrolls, and rods of absorption. A scroll of protection creates a defensive effect with a power rank of 15 and a movement of 1.

Items that create spell like effects usually cannot be used in a duel. Such items include all wands, staves, potions, and miscellaneous magical items, as well as most rods. The combatants, however, can agree in advance to incorporate such items into a duel. The arena must be altered to allow the items to function, and an additional turn of preparation time is required for each class of item to be allowed. If only one particular item is to be allowed, an extra turn of preparation is required.

For example, Delsenora and Calvin decide to have a friendly spellcasting contest, but Calvin wishes to employ his wand of conjuration in the duel. If the pair spends two turns creating the arena, either character could use any wand. If the pair spends three turns preparing, only Calvin’s wand of conjuration can affect the duel—the extra time might be well worth Calvin’s patience.

A spell like effect from an item works just like the spell it simulates. When in doubt, the item creates a leech effect that inflicts a maximum of 6d6 points of damage. A leech from a staff drains a maximum of 8d6 dice of damage, while other items inflict a maximum of 9d6 points of damage. An effect from a device uses the device level to determine the saving throw, not the wielder’s level (see page 144).

Magical bonuses for protective devices, such as enchanted armor and rings of protection, increase the wearer’s power score against spells, but not for personal combat. For example, a priest with a power score of 11 wearing plate armor +2 and a ring of protection +1 has an adjusted power score of 14 against spells. Armor class has no effect on a duel; items such as bracers of defense do not help the wearer. Defensive bonuses to saving throws apply to any saving throw the character makes in the duel. Magical armor can provide saving throw bonuses against missiles and attack/defense spells (see DMG, Chapter 9).

Attack bonuses from magical weapons increase the character’s power score for personal combat, but not against spells. In other words, magical weapons only help when the two magical constructs engage in melee combat instead of casting spells at each other.

Effects from other magical items and spells that are activated and in place on a character when an arena is constructed usually have no effect on a duel. However, the arena can be constructed to allow them to operate. An extra turn of preparation time is required for each effect to be incorporated. Once incorporated, an effect remains in place until it is dispelled or its duration expires.

A preexisting effect can profoundly influence on a duel. For example, a minor globe of invulnerability makes the protected character immune to all 1st through 3rd level spells. The globe can be dispelled, but a dispel magic spell would have to reach the character’s space before it could take effect. A simple protection from evil spell renders the recipient immune to any attack/defense spell that summons creatures. Characters should exercise considerable care before agreeing to allow an opponent to enter the arena with a magical effect already in place. The durations for all preexisting conditions begin on the first round of a duel, not when the spell is initially cast during the arena creation process.

Certain magical effects prevent an arena from being formed; these include the spells antimagic shell, prismatic sphere, Otiluke’s resilient sphere, Otiluke’s telekinetic sphere, any wall spell, and scrolls of protection from magic. None of these effects can be incorporated into an arena, even if both opponents agree.

Specialist Wizards

Specialist wizards’ saving throw adjustments for spells within their schools of specialization apply during duels unless the characters choose to forgo them. Such adjustments require an extra turn of preparation when building the arena. Specialists are free to use any available bonus spells during a duel.

Specialists also suffer from a disadvantage in duels; spells from their opposition schools gain an extra power rank. For example, dispel magic spells have a rank of 13, not 12, when used against illusionists because Abjuration is opposed to Illusion. The bonus represents the specialists’ lack of experience when dealing with magic from their opposition schools.

A dueling arena provides a stable magical environment, and wild surges and level variations never occur within them. It is possible to construct an arena that allows level variations, but both combatants must be wild mages and wild surges still are impossible. In a duel, level variations raise or lower a spell’s power rank.

For example, Johan the Rat casts an unseen servant spell, which normally has a power rank of 10. If Johan rolls a level variation of –5, that particular unseen servant spell has power rank of 5.

A spell’s other dueling characteristics and effects can also be altered by a level variation. For example, if Johan were a 13th level wild mage and cast a fireball spell with a level variation of –5, the fireball spell’s power score would be reduced to 7 and the spell could inflict only 8d6 points of damage. The spell’s movement also would be reduced from 5 to 4.

Elementalists’ saving throw adjustments apply during duels. The elementalist ability to cast a spell at higher level than normal does not apply unless both combatants are elementalists. If used, the casting level increase boosts the spell’s power score and other characteristics in the same manner as described above.

The Spoils of Victory

The combatants are free to decide when a duel ends and what happens to the character who loses the duel, but the general terms must be set in advance. A magical duel always ends when one combatant runs out of spells or runs out of hit points; the combatants choose one or both conditions to apply. The combatants can choose additional conditions for ending the duel, such as when an opponent reaches half hit points or when an opponent casts a certain type of spell. Preparing the arena requires an extra turn for each extra condition and two extra turns if the condition does not apply equally to both opponents.

For example, if Calvin and Delsenora wish to conduct a duel in which the first character to cast an Evocation spell loses, they need one extra turn to build the arena. If they wish to end the duel only when Delsenora casts an evocation spell—leaving Calvin free to use them throughout the duel—they need two extra turns to complete the arena.

Once conditions for ending the duel are set, the duel automatically ends when the condition is met, even if the opponents change their minds. A character can always end a duel early by surrendering and accepting defeat.

The extent of the duel’s consequences depends on the combatants’ resolve and how many levels of spells the combatants invest when forming the arena. Some common terms are listed below:

Friendly Competition: The spellcasters are more interested in who can win than in harming each other. There is little risk to either character, but a treacherous opponent could use the duel to delay his adversary and perhaps gain the upper hand in a future confrontation.

0–6 Spell Levels: All spells cast during the duel remain in the characters’ memories. The opponents’ hit point totals return to normal when the duel ends, though the loser looks a little worse for the wear.

7–12 Spell Levels: The winner retains all spells cast during the duel, and the winner’s hit point total returns to normal when the duel ends. The loser suffers 2d6 points of temporary damage and forfeits 2d4 levels of spells.

13–18 Spell Levels: The winner loses 1d6 levels of spells used during the duel. The winner’s hit point total returns to normal when the duel ends. The loser suffers 4d6 points of temporary damage, which automatically returns an the rate of one hit point per round, and forfeits 4d4 levels of spells.

19+ Spell Levels: The winner loses 4d6 levels of spells used during the duel. The winner’s hit point total returns to normal when the duel ends. The loser suffers 8d6 points of temporary damage and loses 8d4 levels of spells.

Death: The opponents intend to inflict harm upon each other. Timid characters might contribute very few levels of spells to the arena to avoid serious harm.

0–6 Levels of Spells: All spells cast during the duel remain in the characters’ memories. The loser suffers 2d6 points of damage and must save vs. death or die.

7–12 Levels of Spells: The winner loses 1d6 levels of spells cast during the duel. The loser suffers 4d6 points of damage, loses 4d4 levels of spells, and must save vs. death or die.

13–18 Levels of Spells: The winner loses 2d6 levels of spells cast during the duel and suffers 1d6 points of temporary damage. The loser suffers 6d6 points of damage, loses 8d4 levels of spells, and must save vs. death or die. Even if successful, the character must pass a system shock roll or fall unconscious for 2d6 turns.

18–22 Levels of Spells: The winner loses 4d6 levels of spells cast during the duel and suffers 2d6 points of temporary damage. A magical explosion envelops the loser, inflicting 8d6 points of damage. The losing character must save vs. breath weapon. If the save fails, the character dies and all of his equipment must save vs. magical fire or be destroyed. If the save is successful, the character loses consciousness for 2d6 turns. In either case, there is 20% chance the character is blown to another plane. The character also loses 12d4 levels of spells.

23+ Levels of Spells: The winner loses 2d6 levels of spells cast during the duel and suffers 4d6 points of temporary damage. An intense magical explosion envelops the loser and inflicts 10d6 points of damage. The character must save vs. breath weapon. If the save fails, the character dies and all his equipment must save vs. lightning or be destroyed. If successful, the character loses consciousness for 2d6 turns. In either case, there is a 40% chance that the character is blown to another plane. The character also loses 18d4 levels of spells.

Service: The combatants agree to perform some task if they are defeated. The tasks to be performed can be agreed upon before the duel begins or left to the victor’s discretion. The duel has the same effects on the combatants as a friendly competition, with the following additional effects:

0–6 Spell Levels: The loser is charmed (as a charm person spell) by the winner. If a service has been agreed upon in advance, any orders not related to the task allow the charmed character a saving throw to negate the spell. If no task has been agreed upon in advance, the charm functions normally.

7–12 Spell Levels: The loser is charmed as above, and the winner can implant a suggestion (as the 3rd level wizard spell). If a service has been agreed upon in advance, there is no saving throw vs. the spell if it pertains to the service. If the loser resists the suggestion, the charm remains in place.

13–18 Spell Levels: The loser is charmed and subject to suggestion as above, and the winner may place a geas (as the 6th level wizard spell) on the loser. If a service has been agreed upon in advance, there is no saving throw vs. the spell if it pertains to the service. Resisting the geas has no effect on the charm or the suggestion.

19+ Spell Levels: The loser falls completely under the winner’s will and can be dominated (as the 5th level wizard spell domination). If the domination is broken, the winner can immediately geas the loser. The winner is free to issue any commands he wishes within the limits of the domination and geas spells. Even if a service has been agreed upon in advance, the winner may alter the deal. The geas can be lifted only by a wish, dispel magic, or remove curse spell cast by a character of higher level than the winner.

Prize: The combatants are vying to possess some tangible object. In most cases, the character monitoring the duel holds the object and presents it to the winner. The duel itself can be fought to the death, for service (particularly useful if the item being fought over is not present at the dueling site), or can be friendly.

Spell Loss: Spells lost after a duel are gone from the character’s memory as though cast normally. Spells contributed to the arena are always lost. If a character loses a random number of spell levels, he must lose as many spells form memory as are required to meet the total.

For example, Delsenora loses a friendly contest to Calvin. She loses the fireball spell she contributed to the arena and the die roll indicates she must lose four more levels of spells. Delsenora chooses spells from her list of memorized spells to meet the requirement; she can lose four 1st level spells, two 2nd level spells, or any other combination of spells that equals or exceeds four levels.

When a character loses spells after a duel, any material components required to cast the spells are consumed, but the character can regain the spells normally.

The winner cannot lose more levels of spells than were cast during the duel, but the loser can. If a character loses more levels of spells than were memorized before the duel, he loses one point of Intelligence/Reason (if a wizard) or one point of Wisdom/Intuition (if a priest) for each excess level lost. The loss is permanent if the duel was being fought to the death. Otherwise, one point is restored for each full day the character rests. A restoration spell can restore permanently lost points, and a heal spell can restore temporarily lost points.

Damage: The temporary damage a character suffers after a duel automatically returns at a rate of one hit point per round. If temporary damage reduces the character’s hit point total to –10 or less, the character dies. If the character’s hit point total is 0 to –9 he is unconscious until his hit points rise to at least 1.

A victorious character cannot suffer more temporary damage than was suffered in the duel. The loser, however, can suffer more normal damage than was suffered during the duel—the shock of defeat is what inflicts the damage. The Death From Massive Damage rule does not apply in duels (see DMG, Chapter 9).

Charm: The mental effects from a duel fought for service are unaffected by any form of special resistance, including magic resistance, racial resistance to charm effects, and resistance due to high ability scores. The winner bores directly into the loser’s psyche and takes control.

System Shock: The force of the defeat can overwhelm the loser’s body and knock the character out for a short time. A heal spell restores the character to consciousness. Anyone with a weapon can kill an unconscious character with a single blow.

Blown to Another Plane: The loser is hurled through a dimensional rift, leaving behind a pile of dust. The DM can randomly determine which plane the character is blown to or can choose a plane appropriate to the campaign. Any equipment destroyed in the blast remains behind. A wish can recover the lost character.

Death: The force of the defeat kills the character outright. If the character is not blown to another plane, there is a 50% chance the body disintegrates, leaving only a pile of dust. If not disintegrated, the character can be raised, resurrected, or reincarnated normally, but regeneration is ineffective. Only a wish can restore a disintegrated character to life.

Outside Interference

Any kind of attack, successful or not, on a character involved in a magical duel disrupts the arena and ends the duel. Both characters are assumed to be the victor for purposes of the duel’s aftereffects, but the duel’s other terms and conditions are rendered invalid.

It is possible for onlookers to shout advice to combatants, provided that the protective spell surrounding them allows communication. Touching the combatants, handing them equipment, or casting spells on them automatically ends the duel.

Attacks against the mediator of the duel and attempts to breech the protective spell cast by the mediator have no effect on the duel.

The Role of the Mediator

The character engaged to oversee a magical duel is the person who decides how isolated the combatants are. A fairly impenetrable defensive spell, such as prismatic sphere or a hemispherical wall or force, insures that no one can easily disrupt the proceedings. A fairly weak spell, such as protection from evil 10’ radius, offers the combatants very little protection.

The mediator’s secondary roll is keeping things honest. It is his responsibility to make sure the combatants do not employ magical items in an attempt to gain an unfair advantage. It is traditional for the mediator to search each combatant for contraband before construction of the arena begins. Prohibited items are usually confiscated and held until the duel is completed. Careful mediators usually insist on physically searching each combatant to foil nondetection spells and amulets of proof against detection and location, which can defeat divination spells.

The mediator can end the arena construction process just by touching one of the combatants. The mediator can end the duel itself in a similar manner. A dedicated mediator resists attempts to disturb the combatants, but mediators with less resolve have been known to flee when challenged.

The mediator knows how much time each caster spends contributing spells to the arena, and some judges have been known to intervene, ending the duel for good or for ill.

The mediator is under no special compulsions toward fairness or honesty unless duelists take precautions. A geas spell can help insure a mediator’s fairness, but powerful characters can usually avoid the worst effects of violating the geas. It is best if both combatants agree on a mediator they can trust.

If the protective spell the mediator casts over the duelists is large enough, the character can include himself in the spell and be protected along with the combatants. Some spells, such as prismatic sphere, allow the caster free passage in and out, which makes them ideal for mediators who want to keep an eye on the situation outside the arena as well as the battle taking place in the arena.

Magical Duels in the Campaign

A magical duel allows player characters to test their spellcasting prowess in any number of ways. For example, if a party finds a valuable magical item suitable for either of the group’s two wizard PCs, the two characters could conduct a friendly duel to see which one gets the item.

Magical duels can be a useful tool for the DM as well. A nonlethal duel is an excellent way for a rising druid to match wits with an NPC rival when advancing a level. In a similar vein, an NPC wizard might refuse to cooperate by sharing a new spell or some other bit of magical knowledge with the PCs until one of the party spellcasters defeats one of his apprentices—or perhaps the NPC himself—in a duel.

A magical duel can also make an excellent climactic encounter in an adventure. For example, a lich might offer to duel a PC wizard or priest to the death, providing a real challenge to the character. Of course, the rest of the party might have their hands full beating off a sneak attack by the lich’s minions while the duel proceeds, but a duel might give the heroes a better than normal chance to actually slay the lich and still escape the lair with their skins intact. Don’t forget the problem of finding a mediator for the duel. (Do the PCs trust the lich’s sinister necromancer apprentice, or does another party spellcaster step forward, which commits two player characters to the duel?)

An Example of Magical Dueling

Calvin and Delsenora decide to conduct a friendly duel. Tarrant, a local wizard, agrees to mediate.

Calvin and Delsenora agree that the first character to run out of spells or hit points is the loser. Calvin has a ring of spell storing, which the two characters agree should count toward Calvin’s total spells. Both characters agree that no other magical items are going to be used in the duel, and Tarrant looks them over to check for any scrolls or other items.

The trio finds a secluded spot, and Calvin and Delsenora begin creating the arena. When they finish the first step, Tarrant encloses the pair in an Otiluke’s resilient sphere; he chooses to remain outside the sphere.

When Tarrant casts his spell, Delsenora and Calvin consider adding their own spells. Both characters decide not to contribute spells, and the arena is completed. There are 10 spaces between the characters (see figure M1). Because neither character cast a spell, both characters roll 1d10 to see who has the advantage—Calvin wins the roll.

During the first round of the duel, there are no spells to move, so both characters cast spells. Calvin decides to try to get a lick in quickly and casts clairvoyance (L, PR 12, MV 5). The spell appears in the space in front of Calvin and does not move. Delsenora decides to cast withdraw (D, PR 11, MV 1) in her own square as a stationary defense.

On the second round, Calvin moves his clairvoyance spell five spaces toward Delsenora. Because Delsenora cast withdraw in her own square, it doesn’t move at all. Now Calvin casts monster summoning II (AD, PR 13, MV 3) from his ring of spell storing. Delsenora casts dispel magic (AD, PR 12, MV 4). Both spells appear in the squares in front of their casters.

On the third round, things really start hopping. Calvin has the advantage, so his spells move first. His clairvoyance spell is closest to Delsenora, so it moves first. The spell has enough movement to reach Delsenora’s space, but her dispel magic spell is in the way. When the spells meet, Delsenora must announce that her spell is an attack/defense because she is disadvantaged. Calvin checks Table 25 and sees that the advantaged caster decides if combat is going to occur. Calvin decides not to fight; he is not required to reveal anything about his spell.

The clairvoyance spell finishes its move and enters Delsenora’s square. The clairvoyance spell is revealed, and it must check for combat with the withdraw spell before it can affect Delsenora. Because he has the advantage, Calvin could normally decide his leech spell would ignore the defense spell. But, withdraw has a special ability that forces leeches and missiles to fight it.

Both characters roll 1d20. Calvin rolls a 20 and curses his luck. Delsenora rolls a 9. The clairvoyance spell is destroyed, and the advantage shifts to Delsenora, but Calvin still finishes moving his spells; he moves his monster summoning III ahead three spaces. Delsenora moves her dispel magic ahead four spaces, and the two characters cast spells again.

Calvin casts magic missile (M, PR 10, MV 5), and Delsenora casts animate object (AD, PR 15, MV 3).

The duel continues, with Calvin trying to breech Delsenora’s defenses and strike a telling blow before she can crush him under the weight of her more plentiful spells. Calvin could be in trouble if the animate object spell reaches his space, which it might very well do with the dispel magic leading the way.


Special Dueling Characteristics

Many spells behave in unusual ways within a dueling arena. This section provides the necessary details for both individual and groups of spells.

Groups of Spells

Certain groups of spells share common characteristics as outlined below.

Mental or Debilitating Attacks

Spells such as charm person, command, confusion, domination, forget, grease, hold person, suggestion taunt, web, and other spells that make the target respond to the caster’s commands, force an unwanted action, or render the target unable to act freely have only a temporary effect in a duel. The affected character is unable to move or cast spells—but counter spells are allowed—until the hostile spell is destroyed through combat or a counter spell.

Duelists can never be compelled to leave the arena or perform unwanted actions. Instead, control over their mental constructs are temporarily limited.

Creature-Summoning Spells

Spells such as monster summoning and conjure elemental can be especially vulnerable to defensive spells such as protection from evil. These spells are very potent in a duel, forming constructs that conduct character combat upon reaching the opposing spellcaster. The opponent cannot cast any spells except counter spells while a summoning spell occupies his space. He must fight using his power score. Some spells, however, have special abilities that allow them to be used as counter spells against this type of magic.

The summoning spell uses its power score in the battle, and if it succeeds it inflicts 1d6 points of damage per spell level and remains to fight again. If the opponent wins, the summoning spell is destroyed. If a lock occurs, the character suffers no damage, but the summoning spell remains and attacks again the next round—a lock does not destroy a summoning spell as it does in normal character vs. spell combat.

Illusions

Spells such as phantasmal force that allow the caster to create an image of almost anything imaginable are highly flexible in a duel. The spells can be used to duplicate any type of spell. The caster chooses the type when casting the spell. Once cast, the spell type cannot be changed. If employed as an attack, attack/defense, or missile, the opponent and the caster conduct character combat when the illusion reaches the opponent’s space, but the defender is allowed to cast counter spells. If the caster wins the combat, the opponent suffers 1d6 points of damage per level of the illusion. If the defender wins, no damage is inflicted. When employed as a leech, the spell follows the normal rules for leech spells. When employed as a defense, any lock destroys the illusion unless the opposing spell summons a creature.

Reversible Spells

Spells such as cure light wounds cast in their reversed forms create effects that usually function in the opposite fashion from their basic forms. For example, a reversed defensive spell is an attack spell. A reversed leech, however, is still a leech. A spell’s reverse always counters itself and vice versa. For example, a character attacked by a cause critical wounds spell can use a cure critical wounds as a counter spell and automatically destroy the cure critical wounds.

Teleportation

Spells that allow instantaneous travel cannot be locked by spells that create physical barriers, such as the various wall spells. If a lock occurs, the two spells ignore each other instead. If a teleportation spell is used as a counter spell, a lock still destroys both spells.

Individual Spells’ Special Abilities

There are several special abilities common to several spells.

Automatic Defeat: If a spell automatically defeats another spell, it always wins a combat with the listed spell or spell group. This applies when it is used as a counter spell as well.

Cannot be Locked: When a spell cannot be locked by another type of spell, any lock result destroys the opposing spell unless some other special lock effect is specified.

Counter: When a spell is listed as a counter to another spell or type of spell, it can be employed as a counter spell against the listed type even if combat between the two spells is not normally possible. When a spell is listed as an automatic counter to another spell, it destroys the listed spell without a die roll when cast as a counter spell.

Advanced Illusion: See the note on illusions, above.

Antianimal Shell: This spell cannot be locked by spells that summon creatures. It counters creature summoning spells.

Antimagic Shell: Missiles and leeches must battle this spell, and it cannot be locked by any opposing spell. The spell dissipates when it reaches the opponent’s square.

Antiplant Shell: This spell cannot be locked by spells that employ living plants or summon plant creatures, such as entangle or changestaff. It automatically counters plant based spells.

Barrier of Retention†: This spell cannot be locked by spells that summon creatures.

Bigby’s Hand/Fist Spells: These spells conduct character combat when they reach the opponent’s square, just as if they were summoned creatures. Bigby’s interposing hand inflicts no damage, but prevents the opponent from casting any spells until it is destroyed. Other spells inflict damage as listed in their descriptions.

Blade Barrier: This spell cannot be locked by spells that summon creatures.

Blessed Warmth†: This spell cannot be locked by cold based spells. It automatically counters cold based spells.

Blindness: A blinded character cannot cast spells or counter spells (except cure blindness or deafness).

Call Lightning: This spell produces a single stroke of lightning when it reaches the opponent’s space.

Caltrops†: This spell cannot be locked by spells that summon creatures.

Chant: This requires two rounds to cast and cannot be used as a counter spell. The spell is disrupted if the caster fails a saving throw or loses a combat roll during the first round of casting—an exception to the general dueling rule—and the caster cannot cast counter spells during that time.

Chaotic Commands†: When used as a counter spell, chaotic commands always defeats spells that allow the caster to command or control the recipient, such as command, charm person, and suggestion. Whenever victorious against such a spell, the two opponents must conduct character combat. If the caster of chaotic commands wins, the opposing spell reverses direction and moves toward the original caster, functioning as one of the victorious caster’s spells. If the caster of chaotic commands loses the personal combat, the spell is negated.

Circle of Privacy†: This spell cannot be locked by spells that summon creatures.

Cloak of Bravery: This spell cannot be locked by any spell that causes fear or panic, such as emotion, fear, or scare. It automatically counters fear effects.

Cloudkill: This spell cannot be locked by a lower level spell that summons creatures.

Compulsive Order†: Duelists afflicted by this spell are unable to move, attack, or cast spells until the spell is defeated, but counter spells are allowed.

Contact Other Plane: Casting this spell in a duel does not cause insanity. This spell cannot be locked in spell vs. spell combat. If a lock occurs, the two spells ignore each other instead. A lock still destroys this spell if the combat takes place in a character’s space.

Continual Light: When employed as an attack spell, this spell blinds the opponent (save vs. spell negates), preventing movement, attack, or spellcasting until the spell is defeated.

Control Temperature, 10’ Radius: This spell can be cast to raise or reduce the temperature; the caster chooses which one at the time of casting. Once the caster chooses which version to cast, it cannot be changed. The spell cannot be locked by any spell employing the opposite effect (the cold version cannot be locked by heat or fire based spells, and the hot version cannot be locked by cold based spells). This spell automatically counters its opposing effect.

Courage†: This spell cannot be locked by any spell that causes fear or panic, such as emotion, fear, or cloak of fear. It automatically counters fear effects.

Crushing Walls†: This spell cannot be locked by a lower level spell that summons creatures; the opposing spell is destroyed instead.

Crystalbrittle: This spell automatically defeats wall of iron and any other spell that creates a mass of metal, both in combat and when used as a counter spell.

Cure Blindness or Deafness: This spell counters any spell that obscures vision. If locked in combat by a blindness spell, both spells are destroyed instead.

Cure Disease: The reversed form of this spell, cause disease, renders characters unable to move, attack, or cast spells until they defeat the spell.

Cure Wounds Spells: These spells counter any attack or missile spell that inflicts damage. They are counters against leech or attack/defense spells.

Demishadow Magic: When this spell reaches the opponent’s space, the opponent must roll a saving throw vs. spell before casting any counter spells. If the save fails, the spell inflicts 10d6 points of damage, but the caster can attempt a counter spell or a save vs. spell to reduce the damage to 5d6 points. If the initial save succeeds, the spell inflicts 4d6 points of damage, and the caster is free to employ a counter spell or attempt a second saving throw to reduce the damage to 2d6 points.

Demishadow Monsters: This spell functions as any other creature summoning spell. When it reaches the opponent’s space, the opponent rolls a saving throw vs. spells. If the save succeeds, the creatures inflict 2d6 points of damage with a successful attack instead of 5d6 points of damage.

Detect Magic: The opposing spell is revealed even if the detect magic spell is locked or destroyed in combat. A priest must roll a power check, using the character’s power score, to discover what the opposing spell is. The wizard version does not require a power check.

Detect Scrying: This cannot be locked by spells that extend the caster’s perception over a distance, such as clairvoyance, clairaudience, and wizard eye.

Dimension Door: See the note at teleportation on page 108.

Dimensional Folding†: See the note at teleportation on page 108.

Disbelief†: This counters any other spell, including spells that summon creatures.

Disintegrate: This spell always defeats spells that create solid barriers, such as wall spells.

Dispel Magic: If locked or defeated in combat, this can destroy the opposing spell. A normal dispel roll is required (see spell description). Note that some spells cannot be dispelled. The spell dissipates when it reaches the opponent’s space.

Duo-Dimension: Missiles must battle this spell.

Earthquake: When this spell enters the opponent’s space, it whips the arena into crushing and grinding frenzy. The cataclysm forces the opponent to make a successful saving throw vs. death magic or die. If the save succeeds, the opponent still suffers 5d10 points of damage. The only counter spells that are effective against earthquake are antimagic shell, disbelief, dispel magic, elemental aura, fly, and levitate. Character combat is ineffective against this spell.

Efficacious Monster Ward†: This spell can be used as a counter spell against monster summoning I and any other spell of 4th level or less that summons creatures.

Elemental Aura†: The caster chooses the type of elemental aura that is created (air, earth, fire, or water). An elemental aura battles every spell from its element that it meets, regardless of type, and cannot be locked by any spell employing its element—this spell is destroyed instead. If employed as a counter spell, elemental aura automatically destroys spells of its own element.

Elemental Forbiddance†: This spell cannot be locked by a conjure elemental spell. Elemental forbiddance counters conjure elemental spells.

Emotion: The caster chooses this spell’s effect at the time of casting. As a defensive spell, emotion cannot be locked by spells that alter emotions, such as fear, cloak of fear, or emotion control. It automatically counters such spells when they are used as attack or leech spells. If employed as an attack spell, emotion renders the opponent unable to move or cast spells until the spell is defeated.

Emotion Control†: The caster chooses this spell’s effect at the time of casting. As a defensive spell, emotion control cannot be locked by spells that alter or read emotions, such as ESP, fear, and emotion. It automatically counters such spells when they are used as attack or leech spells. If employed as an attack spell, emotion control renders the opponent unable to move or cast spells until the spell is defeated.

Endure Heat/Endure Cold: This spell can be cast to protect against heat or cold; the caster chooses which one at the time of casting. Once the caster chooses which version to cast, it cannot be changed. The spell cannot be locked by any spell employing the opposite effect (the cold version cannot be locked by fire based spells, and the hot version cannot be locked by cold based spells). This spell counters its opposing effect.

Energy Drain: If the target’s combat roll or counter spell fails, the character loses two levels. The level loss persists until the duel ends. The target loses hit points and spell slots commensurate with the level loss, but empty spell slots can be used to satisfy the loss. The target’s power score is unaffected, but saving throws are adjusted accordingly.

Enervation: If the target’s saving throw or counter spell fails, the character loses one level for every four levels of the caster. The level loss persists until the duel ends. The target loses hit points and spell slots commensurate with the level loss, but empty spell slots can be used to satisfy the loss. The target’s power score is unaffected, but saving throws are adjusted accordingly.

Enthrall: If employed as an attack, this spell renders opponents unable to move, attack, or cast spells until they defeat the spell. Enthrall affects only creatures of 4 or less Hit Dice or levels and is usually employed as a leech.

Eyebite: All the versions of this spell conduct character combat. If the spell succeeds, the opponent cannot take offensive action until the spell is defeated.

Fire Purge: This spell requires a full turn (10 rounds) to cast and is seldom employed in duels. The spell is disrupted if the caster fails a saving throw or loses a combat roll during the first nine rounds of casting (an exception to the general dueling rule), and the caster cannot cast counter spells during that time. It is useless as a counter spell.

Fire Seeds: This spell conducts combat when it enters the opponent’s square. The opponent can employ a counter spell or use his power score. If the fire seeds win the combat or defeat the counter spell, it inflicts 8d6 points of damage. If the opponent uses his power score and wins the combat, he must save vs. spells or suffer 4d4 points of damage. If the opponent successfully employs a counter spell, he suffers no damage.

Fire Shield: This spell creates a sheath of hot or cold flames; the caster chooses which at the time of casting. Once the caster chooses which version to cast, it cannot be changed. The spell cannot be locked by any spell employing the opposite effect (the cold version cannot be locked by fire based spells and the hot version cannot be locked by cold based spells). If such a lock is indicated, the opposing spell is destroyed instead. The spell counters its opposing effect. If employed in the caster’s space, this spell destroys attacking spells that summon creatures if a lock occurs.

Flame Walk: This spell cannot be locked by fire based spells, and it counters fire based spells.

Fly: This spell always counters transmute rock to mud.

Forcecage: This spell cannot be locked by spells that summon creatures.

Foresight: This spell counters any other spell.

Free Action: This spell cannot be locked by any spell that restricts movement, such as entangle, hold person, or slow. It automatically counters such spells.

Fumble: Characters affected by this spell cannot move, attack, cast spells, or cast counter spells until they defeat the spell.

Globe of Invulnerability: This spell cannot be locked by spells of 4th level or less. Missiles and leeches of 4th level or less must battle this spell.

Glyph of Warding: This spell cannot be locked by spells that summon creatures.

Goodberry: This spell counters any attack or missile spell that inflicts damage.

Grounding†: This spell cannot be locked by spells that employ electricity, such as lighting bolt or call lightning. It counters any electrical based spell.

Gust of Wind: This spell cannot be locked by spells that create magical clouds such as stinking cloud, cloudkill, and fog cloud. If a lock occurs, both spells are destroyed instead. Gust of wind can be employed as a counter spell to any spell that creates a magical cloud, even if the attacking spell’s type would not normally allow combat.

Haste: This spell automatically destroys—and is automatically destroyed by—slow.

Heal: This spell counters any attack or missile spell that inflicts damage.

Heat Metal: This spell can be employed as an attack spell only against characters who are entitled to wear armor (but can be used even if the character is not actually wearing armor). Characters affected by the attack version of this spell cannot take offensive actions until they defeat the spell, and they suffer three points of damage each round they are affected. The spell can be used as a missile against any opponent, but the caster must choose how it is to be used before the duel starts. The missile conducts character combat when it enters the opponent’s space. If successful, it inflicts one point of damage each round until defeated. The opponent cannot move, attack or cast spells until heat metal is defeated. The caster can choose at the time of casting whether the spell is the heat or cold based version of the spell.

Holy Word: Characters affected by this spell cannot take offensive actions until the spell is defeated. While affected, both character and spell power scores are reduced by two, but the reduction does not apply to combat against the holy word itself.

Hornung’s Baneful Deflector†: Missiles must conduct combat with this spell.

Improved Phantasmal Force: See the note at illusions.

Insect Plague: This spell requires a full turn (10 rounds) to cast and is seldom employed in duels. The spell is disrupted if the caster fails a saving throw or loses a combat roll during the first nine rounds of casting (an exception to the general dueling rule), and the caster cannot cast counter spells during that time. It is useless as a counter spell. Characters afflicted by insect plague cannot take offensive actions until they defeat the spell in combat.

Land of Stability†: This spell counters any spell that summons or manipulates winds, weather, or earthquakes, such as gust of wind, weather summoning, and earthquake. Land of stability cannot be locked by these spells; both spells are destroyed instead. Energy effects, such as lightning bolt and fireball, are not considered weather manipulations for purposes of this spell.

Levitate: This spell always counters transmute rock to mud.

Light: When employed as an attack spell, this spell blinds the opponent (save vs. spell negates), preventing movement, attack, or spell casting until the spell is defeated.

Limited Wish: In a duel, this spell can be used as any other type of spell. When used as an attack, attack/defense, missile, or leech spell, it inflicts 10d6 points of damage (save vs. spells for half). When used as a defense spell, limited wish cannot be locked by any spell of 6th level or less. As a counter spell, limited wish automatically counters any spell of 6th level or lower and can serve as a counter to all other spells. Using limited wish in a duel does not age the caster unless the spell is actually lost from memory in the aftermath (see the Spoils of Victory section).

Liveoak: A character can have only one liveoak effect active in the arena at any given time.

Magical Stone: This spell requires a character combat roll when it reaches the opponent’s square. If it succeeds, it inflicts 3d4 points of damage.

Meld Into Stone: Missiles must conduct combat with this spell.

Melf’s Minute Meteors: The caster must launch five missiles per round. Characters entitled to more than five missiles can launch their remaining missiles the next round or forgo the extra missiles and take another action instead. Extra missiles can counter creature summoning spells that enter the character’s square. Each group of missiles launched functions as a separate spell in the arena. When a group of missiles reaches the opponent’s square, the group conducts character combat. If it succeeds, it inflicts 1d4+1 points of damage for each missile in the group.

Mind Blank: This spell cannot be locked by any spell that attacks the mind. It counters all leech spells and mental attacks.

Minor Globe of Invulnerability: This spell cannot be locked by spells of 3rd level or less. Missiles and leeches of 3rd level or lower must conduct combat with this spell.

Minor Spell Turning†: Missiles and leeches must conduct combat with this spell. This spell cannot be locked; if a lock occurs, the minor spell turning spell is destroyed, and the opposing spell reverses direction and attacks the original caster. If employed as a counter spell, a lock result also causes the opposing spell to reverse direction.

Mirror Image: Missiles must conduct combat with this spell.

Moment†: When this spell reaches the opponent’s square, the spell conducts character combat with a +4 bonus. The actual number rolled determines success or failure, but a successful roll is treated as four higher when comparing rolls. For example, a caster with a PR 13 rolls 12, and the opponent, who also has a PR of 13 rolls a 13. The caster wins because his roll of 12 is treated as a 16.

Mordenkainen’s Disjunction: This spell cannot be locked. When used as a counter spell, it automatically destroys the opposing spell. If defeated in combat, the victorious spell is automatically destroyed. The spell dissipates when it reaches the opponent’s space.

Negative Plane Protection: This spell counters spells that drain life energy, such as energy drain, vampiric touch, and enervation.

Neutralize Poison: This spell automatically counters spells with poisonous effects, such as stinking cloud and cloudkill.

Otiluke’s Freezing Sphere: The caster can choose this spell’s form at the time of casting. As a missile, the spell conducts character combat when reaching the opponent’s space and inflicts 6d6 points of damage. As an attack spell, Otiluke’s freezing sphere inflicts 1d4+2 points of damage per level of the caster (maximum 10d4+20), save vs. spell for half.

Otiluke’s Resilient Sphere and Otiluke’s Telekinetic Sphere: These spells cannot be locked by spells that summon creatures. When they reach the opponent’s space, the spells conduct character combat. If they succeed, the opponent cannot take offensive actions until the spells are defeated. Missiles must conduct combat with these spells.

Permanency: When used in a duel, this spell does not drain the caster’s Constitution score, even if it is subsequently lost from memory.

Permanent Illusion: See the note at illusions.

Phantasmal Force: See the note at illusions.

Physical Mirror†: Missiles and leeches must conduct combat with this spell. If this spell succeeds against or achieves a lock with any missile, leech, or attack spell, the opposing spell reverses direction and attacks the original caster. If employed as a counter spell, a lock result also causes missiles, leeches, and attacks to reverse direction.

Produce Fire: The reversed form of this spell is a defensive spell that counters any fire based spell.

Protection From Evil and Protection From Evil, 10' Radius: These spells cannot be locked by spells that summon creatures.

Protection From Fire: This spell automatically counters any fire based spell.

Protection From Lightning: This spell automatically counters any electrical based spell.

Rainbow: This spell can be cast in one of two versions, which the caster chooses at the time of casting. The bridge version is a leech. The bow version creates four missiles on the round of casting, plus three more missiles that the caster can loose on the second round or forgo the extra missiles and take another action instead. The extra missiles can counter creature summoning spells that enter the character’s square. Each group of missiles functions as a separate spell in the arena. When a group of missiles reaches the opponent’s square, the spell conducts character combat. If it succeeds, it inflicts 1d6+2 points of damage for each missile in the group. Missiles from this spell cannot be locked by spells that summon elemental creatures.

Raise Dead: This spell counters any spell that inflicts damage.

Reincarnate: This spell counters any spell that inflicts damage.

Remove Curse: Characters afflicted by this spell’s reverse cannot take offensive actions until they defeat the spell. This spell automatically counters its reverse and can counter any attack spell that does not inflict damage.

Remove Fear: This spell automatically counters any spell that causes magical fear.

Remove Paralysis: This spell automatically counters all hold spells and any spell that causes paralysis.

Repel Insects: This spell cannot be locked by any spell that summons or controls insects, such as insect swarm, creeping doom, and giant insect. This spell counters all such spells.

Resist Fire/Resist Cold: This spell protects against either fire/heat or cold. The caster chooses which at the time of casting. The spell cannot be locked by the type of effect it protects against.

Restoration: This spell cannot be locked by any spell that drains life energy or causes insanity. It automatically counters such effects. This spell does not age the caster unless actually lost from memory in the aftermath (see the Spoils of Victory section).

Resurrection: This spell can counter any spell that inflicts damage. This spell does not age the caster unless actually lost from memory in the aftermath (see the Spoils of Victory section).

Reverse Gravity: Characters afflicted by this spell cannot take offensive actions until they defeat the spell.

Sanctuary: Missiles and leeches must conduct combat with this spell.

Screen: This spell cannot be locked by spells that extend the caster’s senses, such as ESP, clairaudience, or clairvoyance. It automatically counters such spells.

Shadowcat: This spell dissipates upon reaching the opponent’s space.

Shadow Magic: When this spell reaches the opponent’s space, the opponent rolls an immediate saving throw vs. spell before casting any counter spells. If the save fails, the spell inflicts 10d6 points of damage, but the caster can attempt a saving throw vs. spell to reduce the damage to 5d6 points or attempt a counter spell. If the initial save succeeds, the caster is free to employ a counter spell or attempt a second saving throw to reduce the damage to 1d6 points. If the saving throw is failed or the counter spell is defeated, the spell inflicts 2d6 points of damage.

Shield: Missiles must conduct combat with this spell. This spell always defeats magic missile.

Shillelagh: When this spell reaches the opponent’s square, the spell conducts character combat and inflicts 1d6 points of damage and can attack again if successful.

Shrieking Walls†: This spell cannot be locked by spells that summon creatures.

Silence, 15' Radius: Characters afflicted by this spell cannot take offensive actions until they defeat the spell.

Slow: Characters afflicted by this spell cannot take offensive actions until they defeat the spell. This spell always defeats—and is defeated by—haste.

Snare: When this spell reaches the opponent’s square, the spell conducts character combat. If the spell succeeds, the opponent cannot take offensive actions until the spell is defeated.

Spectral Force: See the note at illusions.

Spell Immunity: Missiles must conduct combat with this spell.

Spell Turning: Missiles and leeches must conduct combat with this spell. This spell cannot be locked; if a lock occurs, the spell turning is destroyed, and the opposing spell reverses direction and attacks the original caster. If employed as a counter spell, a lock result also causes the opposing spell to reverse direction.

Spike Growth and Spike Stones: These spells cannot be locked by spells that summon creatures.

Spiritual Hammer: When this spell reaches the opponent’s square, the spell conducts character combat and inflicts 1d6 points of damage if successful. The spell continues attacking each round until defeated or its duration expires.

Stabilize†: This spell is ineffective within a dueling arena.

Stone to Flesh: Characters afflicted by this spell cannot take offensive actions until they defeat the spell.

Stoneskin: This spell can counter any spell that inflicts damage.

Succor: See the note at teleportation.

Tanglefoot: This spell cannot be locked by spells that summon creatures.

Telekinesis: When this spell reaches the opponent’s square, the spell conducts character combat and inflicts 1 point of damage per caster level if successful.

Teleport: See the note at teleportation.

Teleport Without Error: See the note at teleportation.

Transmute Rock to Mud: This spell always defeats wall of stone. Characters afflicted by this spell cannot take offensive actions until they defeat the spell.

True Seeing: This spell always defeats illusions.

Unluck: Characters afflicted by this spell cannot take offensive actions until they defeat the spell.

Wall of Fog: Missiles must conduct combat with this spell.

Wall of Force: Missiles must conduct combat with this spell. Wall of force can be defeated in combat only if it fails its combat roll or by another spell’s special ability. If the roll succeeds, it locks the opposing spell, including dispel magic. The spell dissipates when it reaches the opponent’s space.

Watery Double†: This spell conducts character combat when it reaches the opponent’s space. If it succeeds, it inflicts 3d6 points of damage and can continue to attack each round until defeated or its duration expires.

Wildwind† and Wildzone†: These spells are ineffective in a dueling arena.

Wish: This spell can be used as any other type of spell. When used as an attack, attack/defense, missile, or leech spell, it inflicts 10d6 points of damage (save vs. spells for half). When used as a defense spell, wish cannot be locked by any spell. As a counter spell, wish automatically counters any spell. Using wish in a duel does not age the caster unless the spell is actually lost from memory in the aftermath (see the Spoils of Victory section).

Withdraw: Missiles and leeches must conduct combat with this spell.

Word of Recall: See the note at teleportation.

Zone of Sweet Air: This spell cannot be locked by spells that create noxious gases, such as stinking cloud and cloudkill.